EDITORS’ NOTE

The theme of this issue is “South Asia and the World.” Three papers and a translation locate South Asian cultures and politics in global contexts across contemporary, colonial and precolonial times. Through their explorations of space and place, situatedness and displacement, they shed light on the interactions between global and local hegemonies and how they shape the constructions of meaning and performances of identity. Continued.

 

VOLUME XXIV • 2016

 

“TEMPLE OF MY HEART” (PRAN’ER MONDIR)
The Affective Dimensions of Religious Space in Montreal’s Hindu Bangladeshi Community
Aditya N. Bhattacharjee 

GHANI KHAN
A Postmodern Humanist Poet-Philosopher
Safoora Arbab 

THE UNTOUCHABLE OR THE “UNSPEAKABLE?”
Reversing Double Mimesis in Mulk Raj Anand’s Conversations in Bloomsbury and Untouchable
Amrita Mishra 

NAVARĀTRI IN SOUTH INDIA
Symbolism and Power in Royal Rituals
Nalini Rao


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Richard Garbe, German Indology, and the Messiness of (A)theistic Sāṃkhya

JONATHAN DICKSTEIN

"This paper examines the work of Richard Garbe (1857–1927), a German Protestant Indologist who studied the history and theology of Indian religious traditions. Garbe was one of many German scholars intent on uncovering the ‘genuine’ authorship of seminal Indian texts such as the Upaniṣads, the Mahābhārata, and the Bhagavad Gītā. His work would impact intellectual debates with socio-political consequences, as evident in the 'pantheistic controversy' and various Indo-Aryan hypotheses …

Globalizing Pakistani Identity: Ali Zafar and the Politics of Crossover Stardom

DINA KHDAIR

"Few studies have examined how the changing landscape of cultural production in India shapes the negotiation of religious and national identities onscreen in an increasingly integrated global media environment. This essay explores the representation and reception of Ali Zafar, an independent be perpetuated in both India and the West. What does it mean to be a Pakistani star in India, and which 'identity' takes precedence in popular discourse—national or religious, if any such distinction can be made? …

Nostalgia: Tears of Blood for a Lost World

MARGRIT PERNAU

"This article historicizes nostalgia by looking at literary texts in Urdu, written from in Delhi between 1857 and the First World War. It traces its development from the testimonies of the immediate survivors of the revolt, for whom the personal loss was still embedded in known rules governing the world, down to those who saw progress as inevitable, but who still mourned the past as a lost world and posited it as a counter-narrative to the colonial present and to modernity …


"Don't You Know Sita?" by R. Chudamani

PREETHA MANI

"R. Chudamani was born in 1931 and grew up in an Iyengar Brahmin family in Chennai. Due to a disability, she rarely ventured far from her family home, was home-schooled for most of her childhood, and produced all of her writing there. She generally refrained from engaging in literary critical debate and wrote no autobiographical reflections. In a short interview published one year after her death in 2010—the only published interview with Chudamani that I have found thus far—she underscores the literariness she aimed to uphold …


"Eighth Letter to Uncle Sam" by Saadat Hasan Manto

MATT REECK and AFTAB AHMAD

"The fiction of Saadat Hasan Manto has been read primarily through the lens of the birth of nationalism in South Asia. This reading lens is not necessarily wrong, but it does reduce his fictional output to a rather uncharacteristic uniformity of purpose and effect. On the other hand, his nine “Letters to Uncle Sam” do quite directly address questions of the nation in South Asia and beyond. Thinking of these letters within the context of the literary forms of the postcolonial nation-state is revealing …